Amaria Jones
13-Year-Old Girl Fatally Shot in Neck While Teaching Mom TikTok Dance Inside Home

13-Year-Old Girl Fatally Shot in Neck While Teaching Mom TikTok Dance Inside Home

The bullet went through a “Chicago Lives Matter” sign before hitting Amaria Jones.

A 13-year-old girl was killed over the weekend in Chicago while showing her mom a new dance move in their own home, per police.

Amaria Jones was fatally shot by a stray bullet from outside her apartment that went through her television and struck her in the neck.

“She was showing me this dance called TikTok,” Amaria’s mother, Lawanda Jones, told CBS Chicago

“I turned around and I was looking for her and she was on the ground reaching out like this, holding her neck,” she continued. “I was like, ‘What?! What?! What?!'”

“The last thought that I have of my baby is her reaching out with blood gushing out her neck,” she continued.

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On Saturday, an unknown gunman fired the shots that also hit two teenage boys outside Amaria’s apartment.

The boys were taken to a local hospital and were listed in good condition. Amaria was taken to Stroger Hospital of Cook County in critical condition and died about a half-hour later.

“No one wants to be a member of burying their child,” Jones said. “It’s supposed to be is — them burying us, not us burying them.”

Per the outlet, the bullet that killed Amaria also pierced a “Chicago Lives Matter” sign hanging outside her apartment.

“Our kids are not safe no more. Period,” Jones said. “You can’t sit on your porch. You can’t even be in your own house. You’ll get killed.”

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Jones has called for the person that killed her daughter to turn themselves in to authorities.

Amaria’s death marked one of 15 shooting fatalities in Chicago over the weekend, the deadliest of the year so far, which included a toddler and three other teenagers, per Chicago Sun Times.

“To the other parents whose kids got shot — my heart goes out to them too, because don’t nobody know what it’s like unless you are in these shoes, to lose a child,” Jones said to CBS Chicago.

“You might sympathize with us, but you ain’t going to feel the pain until it actually happens.”

Meanwhile, a vigil was held Monday night to honor Amaria, who dreamed of becoming an attorney one day, Jones said.