vagina museum
First Punani Museum in The World To Open Soon (Details)

OccupyGh.com has learnt that the first ‘Punani’ museum in the world solely dedicated for it is to be open soon in London.

The report from CNN indicates that the Punani museum will be opened in November and it will educate patronizers about the delicate organ, fighting the stigma surrounding it.

Florence Schechter, the founder of the museum developed the concept for the Punani Museum after discovering a museum dedicated to 4-5s in Iceland, the Icelandic Phallological Museum, but no counterpart for ‘Punanis’

vagina museum in london
First Punani Museum in The World To Open Soon (Details)

Schechter and her team subsequently launched a campaign on Crowdfunder, initially aiming to raise £300,000.

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There’s nothing shameful or offensive about vulvas and ‘Punanis’.”

“As this is the world’s first bricks-and-mortar museum dedicated to ‘Punanis’, vulvas and the gynaecological anatomy, we didn’t quite know what to expect in terms of interest, and were delighted with the £50,000 we raised,” Williams said.

The museum will open on November 16 in a temporary location in London’s Camden Market, with an exhibition entitled “Muff Busters: ‘Punanis’ Myths and How to Fight Them.” The exhibition will challenge “pervasive myths” about the ‘Punanis’ and vulva, Williams said, “such as that ‘Punanis’ and vulva need to be cleaned through the use of bespoke feminine cleaning products; however, the ‘Punanis’ is completely self-cleaning,” development and marketing manager Zoe Williams told CNN.

Comedy and theater events, craft workshops and educational talks will take place at the museum, she said, which will help to raise funds for a permanent location. The museum’s mission statement asserts that it will also “act as a forum for feminism, women’s rights, the LGBT+ community and the intersex community,” “challenge heteronormative and cisnormative behaviour” and “promote intersectional, feminist and trans-inclusive values.”

“We want to give everyone the confidence to talk about a perfectly normal part of the anatomy,” Williams explained, citing a study from cancer research charity The Eve Appeal that found 65% of young women and girls in the UK struggled to use the words “Punanis” or “vulva.”

“There’s nothing shameful or offensive about vulvas and ‘Punanis’… They’re a part of the body that should be celebrated!” She said